Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

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Robert
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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Mon Nov 14, 2005 10:51 pm

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Cyrus have released further information on the CyrusLink TM components. The Cyruslink range includes three main components: Linkserver, Linkport and Linkwand. At the heart of the system is a high-performance multi-room enabled Hard Disc server called Linkserver. Users can play back music in many remote zones via client units called Linkports, streaming the music digitally from the main server. Controlling all of this is Linkwand, a new software product also compatible with the established range of Hi-Fi and AV system components.

Linkserver £4000

The upgradeable Linkserver includes Cyrus' highly regarded Q DAC technology and a Hard Disc providing massive media storage capability. Linkserver can store over 4,000 CDs using MP3 or an amazing 400 uncompressed CDs for the maximum audio performance. That's 40,000 tracks lasting over 4,000 hours before you hear the same track again! Linkserver also controls four wired zones plus six Linkport music centres. The Linkserver can integrate with the wide range of Cyrus Audio and AV components and can even play audio sources in a remote zone.

Linkport £650

Compact Cyrus music centre components called Linkports are installed around the home. These Linkports can use Ethernet or wireless connection to the main server and offer RDS and Internet radio, an upgradeable power amp and a large screen to allow easy access to media stored on the Linkserver.

Linkwand £200

Uniquely, the whole system can be controlled through new, wireless, touch-panel control software called Linkwand. Linkwand is a software system compatible with the latest generation of Windows CE compatible PDAs and webpads. Simply touch the icons on the screen to control the media library on the server, multi-room settings and all the Cyrus audio components. You can even view the cover art of the album, chosen from the server's massive disc library.

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home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Mon Nov 14, 2005 10:53 pm

Cyrus Linkserver © What Hifi April 2004

Look, Ma, no wires!

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The view from last year?s big hi-fi shows (including our own), echoed by the massive 2004 CES exhibition in the United States, was that wireless networking is the way of the future. Of course that?s hardly news: the Yamaha MusicCAST and the Marantz/Mordaunt-Short Opus systems have been around for a while, and there?s no shortage of rival music servers either on the way or just about to come our way: NetTunes from Onkyo is just one of the many examples.

But Cyrus has approached the whole music server idea with a somewhat different take: while other companies tend to depend on data compression to store and distribute music, the Cyrus system ? based on Xiva server technology and standard 802.11b wireless networking ? has quality as a major concern. That?s why the default storage mode of the Linkserver is uncompressed CD-quality audio, and the reason for the use of the company?s DAC7 technology on the server?s main outputs. Of course, there?s also the option of adding one of Cyrus?s PSX-R power supplies to further enhance sound quality. Cyrus is claiming the main zone output of the server is on a par with that of its dedicated CD players, which is certainly fighting talk.

It?s tempting to look at the Cyrus server beside other Xiva-based devices and suspect that this is an exercise in badge engineering, not least because the unit looks so different from the standard Cyrus ?brick? styling. Similarly, one might look at the Linkport remote unit alongside the client devices sold by Onkyo for its NetTunes system and wonder whether the same thing is going on. But things aren?t quite what they seem: yes, the main platform of the Linkserver is made by Xiva ? with casework from the same source for expediency and cost reasons ? and the Linkports are sourced from Onkyo, but both units are subject to extensive sonic tuning and component upgrades by the engineers at Cyrus.

So the server uses Cyrus audio circuitry from front to back ? even on its three extra analogue multiroom zones ? and the Linkport is the highest grade of several such clients made by Onkyo: budget models sell for as little as £200 or so back home in Japan, but this one ? complete with onboard FM RDS/AM tuner and built-in amplification ? will set you back £650. Six Linkports can be used with each Linkserver, with the connections made either via simple Ethernet cables or via a wireless network system. There?s more on what else you need in our ?Making the connection? panel, but it?s interesting to see that Cyrus, like the Onkyo, has decided it?s not in the computer peripherals business, and leaves the choice of networking hardware to the buyer or installer.

Talking as we were of prices, the Linkserver will set you back £2999 fitted with a 160GB hard drive, or £3499 for the 250GB unit, which will store over 400 CDs uncompressed, or 4500 when MP3 compression is used. Simple menus allow the unit to be set up and used relatively quickly, while a built-in modem allows the unit to grab disc information and even cover images from the CDDB/Gracenote internet database. A video output is provided to allow this information to be displayed, along with the server?s menus, playlists and so on, on a TV screen, while a comprehensive remote control handset is also provided. Outputs on the server even allow a complete Cyrus separates system to be controlled, using the company?s MC Bus system.

The Linkport unit has its own remote, and can access any of the music stored on the server via a network connection, playing this out either via line connections into a system or via its own amplification into a pair of speakers. There?s an internal tuner, inputs for a ?local? line source ? such as a CD player or even TV sound ? and even the ability to access internet radio streams when the system is hooked up to a broadband modem via a network.

In use, two things about the Cyrus grab the attention: one is the speed with which tracks or even whole albums are accessed; the other is how good the system sounds. The Linkserver is a very good player indeed, whether using its own drive or working from the hard disk; it?s more than up to the standard of many a simple CD playback device with audiophile aspirations, and it gains even better weight and definition when the PSX-R is plugged into the rear.

The appeal of having a huge library of music at your fingertips can?t be overstated ? it will change the way you and your family listen to your music collection. Whether we played music through our main system or accessed it via the Linkport in another room, tracks popped up as fast as we could press buttons, without the kind of wait we?ve found on some rival system.

It?s hard not to feel that Cyrus has got this system very well sorted from the off, and it deserves to do well in the custom installation business ? at the moment it?s only going to be sold through a limited number of specialist dealers, able to install, configure and even load all of your discs onto the system for you.

If we have a doubt about the Cyruslink system, it?s that ? however great the appeal of such a system may be ? the thick end of £4000 for a 250GB Linkserver and just one Linkport, plus the cost of the networking hardware, puts it firmly in the luxury audio arena. We can?t help feeling wi-fi will be much more exciting when it?s at a price the average person can afford.
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:05 pm

Linkserver Solo and Quattro



Two new Cyruslink server systems called Linkserver Solo and Quattro to be launched in Feb 05.


The below Press Release explains why Solo will be the most important music server launch this year. Priced at only £1800 the Solo is so called because this model has a single high performance Cyrus tuned DAC output. A more powerful 4 zone model called Quattro with a wide range of HD options up to 1,000Gb (2 x 500 Gb drives) will be available in March. The Solo and Quattro names will be familiar to all Cyrus consumers and continues our established tradition of naming products after functionality.


In a sometimes technically overwhelming market we believe the consumer will understand the Solo is a single output server while the Quattro offers 4 zones.


In addition to the analogue outputs both servers are able to link into the wider Cyruslink system components. Both servers can simultaneously stream to 10 independent Linkport client music centres. Importantly all Cyrus Linkservers are compatible with the worlds established custom install architectures for maximum system integration.


Press release:
Huntingdon Friday 10th December 2004

Linkserver Solo

Solo is a Cyrus CD player with HD drive and Ethernet client option.
The Cyruslink brand was launched in 2004 to place Cyrus at the forefront of integrated home entertainment technology. Our highly acclaimed Linkserver, Linkport and Linkwand models established Cyruslink at the highest performance level in home media servers. 2005 will see the Cyruslink product range evolve into an even more powerful and accomplished 2nd generation line-up.


The new Linkserver Solo is a feature rich CD player with a built in HD drive capable of storing all but the largest of music collections. The new Solo can rip CD?s at turbo speeds of up to 22x, and our special Cyrus tuned DAC?s ensures outstanding audio quality, making the Linkserver Solo the music lovers 1st choice for music server systems. The Solo can link with up to 10 fully featured clients called Linkports, allowing the Solo to distribute your centrally stored digital media files all around your home. If you eventually fill the 80 Gb HD drive just add a second larger drive but with a capacity of over 1000 CD?s for the 80Gb model it may be some time before you ask Cyrus to upgrade capacity. Planned for 05 is a 500Gb drive that will swallow the largest collections, even using Cyrus?s uncompressed max quality record feature we are talking vast storage capacity.

The Solo?s powerful new PC software makes it faster than ever to swap and manage your media with an iPod or your PC. The Linkserver Solo is now compatible with leading PC media software like Windows Media Player & Apple iTunes. The Solo is also capable of importing music from external sources such as Mini-disc and vinyl via its Optical, Coaxial and RCA inputs.

You can even connect your Solo to the TV so you can navigate
your music collection from the comfort of your armchair.

If our entry model Linkserver Solo whets you appetite for more, then our specially trained Cyruslink dealers can explain the wider range of more powerful server and wireless installation options that offer the very best in digital multiroom server technology.

The Linkserver Solo will sell at just £1,800 with more powerful HD options available from launch in Feb 05.

Also new;
The Linkserver Quattro will launch in May and offers multiple HD?s and four wired multiroom zones plus up to ten Linkport clients all running independently and simultaneously.

home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Thu Nov 17, 2005 1:31 pm

Cyruslink Networked Music Server from eHomeUpgrade

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Cyrus has released the Cyruslink Linkserver, their first networked music server that is sure to turn some heads. The Linkserver is a hard drive based unit (available in 160GB or 250GB capacity) that can store over 400 uncompressed albums or over 4,500 using its lowest of 3 bit rate MP3 compression options. Once albums are stored, Linkserver can stream music in a variety of formats (by album, individual tracks, randomly, artist, genre, or playlist) to up to 6 Linkport music client devices around the house. However, you don?t need a Linkport client if you plan on just using the server in one room?an especially welcomed feature since most networked music servers require a client for music control and playback.

The Linkport in itself is quite impressive; it is an upgradeable, compact, unit with a built-in stereo amplifier and AM/FM radio with RDS capability?meaning it can pull the title and artist of a song playing from the radio. Moreover, Linkport can access Internet radio stations via a broadband connection.

Operation of the Linkserver and Linkport is easily accomplished using the included IR remote and reading the unit?s display information or TV user-interface (via Linkserver's VGA connection). What?s more, Cyrus has developed an icon-based, Wi-Fi Pocket PC application, called the Linkwand that allows you to roam around the house and have access to every track in your music library.
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Thu Nov 17, 2005 1:36 pm

Is This the Hi-Fi of the Future? @ www.smarthouse.com.au

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Months of music on tap with its vast 250GB Hard-Drive capacity and quality sound, the cyruslink system is able to store a lifetime's worth of cd's. Its the ultimate duke box.

THE CYRUSLINK SYSTEM is based around a Linkserver 'hub', to which you add Linkport 'clients'. The server usually sits in your main listening room, and you can choose from a 160GB or 250GB hard drive. That means the top version stores 450 discs in uncompressed form, or 4500 discs in MP3.

The server offers analogue and digital multiroom capability: four analogue outputs allow you to play a track simultaneously in the main listening room and in three other rooms. This needs a power amp and a pair of speakers for each remote zone, with speaker cables from each power amp to the remote speakers. If you don't want to investigate building work, the wireless, digital option makes more sense for existing homes. Each extra requires a Linkport system, a compact client hi-fi that connects to the Linkserver network via an Ethernet cable, or using standard wireless networking components.

The server handles a maximum of six Linkports and, if your main unit has a broadband connection, can deliver internet radio around
the house. Add these six connections to the four analogue outputs
and you have a 10-zone system.

You can upgrade using branded extras. Linkwand software lets you view your music library from anywhere in the house, on a palmtop. The server accepts the Cyrus PSX-R external power supply. To further boost sonics, you can feed the Linkserver output into a high-quality amp; and if you use a Cyrus unit, you can add another PSX-R to that, too.

Last, but not least, you must add speakers. A Cyrus Q7 DAC module is fitted internally to Linkserver units, so you can afford to couple the system with some decent-quality speakers.

The Cyrus system is based on more affordable kit - the server uses Xiva technology, and the Linkports are sourced from Onkyo - but both units receive Cyrus tuning. The sound has both detail and poise.

Ten Zones Sorted

ZONE 1 - The Cyrus is the best-sounding 'hub' system of its type, and can be usefully employed both as an audio server and as a CD player, especially if you add in a PSX-R power supply. In its biggest 250GB guise it can store thousands of tracks.

ZONE 2 - through to 10 You can employ both wired and wireless solutions here. If you add power amplifiers and long runs of Cat-5 cable, you can 'bury' a wired audio system into your home for a permanent connection to four zones. Alternatively, use Linkports for six-zone wireless audio.
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyruslink: Linkserver / Linkport / Linkwand / Quattro

Postby Robert » Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:32 am

EHC 07 Jukebox Group Test 6/1/04

FROM £3,650
"Once you?ve tried this lovingly crafted server system you?ll never go back"

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Cyrus IS ONE OF THE UK?S MOST INTERESTING ELECTRONICS manufacturers. The Cambridgeshire-based company has always believed in doing things its own way, and has always put sound ? and more recently picture ? quality above such fripperies as features. Even its trademark half-sized case work has as much to do with sonic functionality as it does stylish looks. It?s something of a surprise then, that Cyrus is one of the first firms in the UK to really get to grips with the concept of servers and wireless networking. Surely the world of hard-disk storage and streaming audio can?t sit comfortably with the company?s hi-fi pedigree? Or is it just Cyrus?s ear for quality that the whole server shebang has been crying out for.

The main part of the CyrusLink concept is the LinkServer, quite obviously
cased on the Xiva technology developed by Imerge. It comes in two flavours: LinkServer 160 or 250, the number representing the size of the hard drive in gigabytes. The LinkServer?s sizable hard-disk drive allows you to store a whopping 400 uncompressed albums on it ? stretching all the way up to 4,500 albums at the highest rate of compression. You can also have a mixture of compressed and uncompressed discs, so you can have your favourites at high quality for superior listening, and the rest stored as MP3 for background enjoyment. All this functionality can be accessed via your PC, which can also be used to set up playlists for the perfect music no matter what mood you are in. As with the majority of products in this group, track labelling is achieved courtesy of the very efficient Gracenote CD database ? so you?ll never have to type in the name of a CD again ? unless, like us, you buy live bootlegs of small bands at gigs, as these were the only CDs that managed to catch the search facility out.

As a nod towards Cyrus?s audiophile heritage, the back of the LinkServer has a Prime Audio output. This fairly standard looking pair of analogue outputs takes its signal direct from the brand?s high quality Q7 DAC, providing the perfect and shortest path for the signal, with the obvious benefits to sound quality that this entails. Other connections are standard at the higher-end of this group, and the LinkServer also distinguishes itself as a good quality CD player as well as a device for ripping music.

The LinkServer can feed up to four zones on its own via RCA jacks which you would run into an amplifier and speakers in the designated room, without the need for other hardware. This means that with this one unit you can assemble a reasonably effective analogue multi-room system. However, that?s bypassing the appeal of the Cyrus system, which is the way it uses wireless networking to create a digital multi-room setup. Simply connect a standard wireless router via the Ethernet cable at the back, and you can then control up to six extra zones using the Linkport client unit. It is simple to do, although as Cyrus is supplying mainly through custom installers you?re unlikely to get the opportunity to do it yourself.

Rather sensibly Cyrus has decided to make the Linkports as attractive as
possible ? they look a bit like Denon?s range of stylish mini systems. You can feed up to six of these at any one time if you use a combination of wired and wireless connections, and each has a built in FM tuner plus a pair of standard line inputs so you can have a separate source ? for example a games console ? just in that room.

The sound quality from the main server is first-rate, and offers audiophile
levels of performance that only the Linn setup can match in terms of detail and authenticity to the original disc. Switching down to MP3 offers a significant reduction in sound quality, but for background listening the 320KBps files offer good sonics, although we?d leave the lower bitrates alone unless you don?t mind a drastic drop-off in acoustics.

The Cyrus system is also easy to use once you are up and running: the mini system-like slave units offer a friendly front-end to the system, and also mean that you don?t need to install wall units the way you do with the Linn. It uses a nifty piece of software called Linkwand, which allows you to control your entire system from your computer, or even more appealingly via a Pocket PC Personal Digital Assistant. Selecting music and playlists couldn?t be easier, and it?s well worth the £200 asking price for the software.

This impressive system bridges an important gap between the prices of the
impressive Yamaha system and the ridiculously high-end Linn offering. It offers a level of functionality that even the most technologically-minded purchaser will find reassuring, but at the same time is simple enough to use that you?ll quickly get to grips with it, and find yourself wondering why you ever needed to get up and change CDs every time you wanted to listen to something new.

What?s good about this jukebox
? Performance benefits from Cyrus proprietary processing
? Simple but effective wireless option

What?s bad about this jukebox
? More expensive than the Imerge
? Low bitrate transfers a waste of time

We say: The Cyrus offers extensive features for both the serious audiophile and the person who simply wants to play MP3 music.

Group Test Winner - Imerge S2000
CHOOSING AN OVERALL WINNER FOR THIS GROUP HASN?T BEEN
easy ? each option could be the perfect solution for someone, depending on their budget and requirements. The Linn system shows what you can achieve if money is no object but for most people money is an object, hence the astronomical price rules it out of contention in the context of this group. Meanwhile, the Perception Digital and Fidelity PC/Pinnacle ShowCenter combination also illustrate that you don?t just have to buy an off-the-shelf system costing £1,000s to enjoy digital audio in the home.
Of the more conventional systems, the Imerge and Cyrus just edge out the
Yamaha in terms of ease of use and performance. The Cyrus is a virtual
clone of the Imerge save for price. At the end of the day, by a whisker we declare that the Imerge is the original and best.
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers