Cyrus CD6 SE

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Robert
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Cyrus CD6 SE

Postby Robert » Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:20 pm

Cyrus CD 6 SE

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The new CD 6 SE may be our entry CD player but it?s based on the same platform as its more exotic siblings. In fact all three players in the range are upgradeable from one to another so you benefit from many upgrade possibilities. This player uses the same low-contact precision slot loading CD drive as the CD Xt SE transport so you can be assured that it?s build quality is unquestionable. The CD 6 SE uses our latest SE engineering to raise the standards over last year?s model that was voted CD product of the year 2006 by What Hi-Fi.

In our opinion, the CD 6 SE comfortably out performs the CD 8 X. See our upgrade information to learn how you can upgrade from many CD models to a new ?made for high-end audio? Servo Evolution model.
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyrus CD6 SE

Postby Robert » Fri Feb 20, 2009 1:22 pm

Cyrus CD6 SE review
New 'SE' player takes advantage of proprietary technology

Our Score ImageImageImageImageImage


We first investigated Cyrus's new 'Servo Evolution' technology, in the context of the £1,100 CD8. It has now been applied to the whole of the Cyrus CD player range, including this new entry-level CD 6 SE which (according to Cyrus) out performs the original, pre-SE, CD8!

The idea of Servo Evolution is bold and commendable. In essence, Cyrus has developed its own transport, taking a more detailed view of exactly what goes on at the sharp end of the laser than most hi-fi manufacturers, who incorporate transports purchased as ready-made subassemblies.

That said, Cyrus still buy in the mechanics: it's the signal processing that is unique. So why bother? Well, principally because the servo system in normal transports is optimised more towards readability of dodgy discs than the finer niceties of high fidelity. Cyrus reasoned that the customer who pays £900 for a CD player probably takes great care of his/her CDs! And although the proof will be in the listening, we find this kind of design approach admirable.

We also rather like the adoption of a slot-loading mechanism, which experience has taught us is actually better than a tray ? easier to navigate without looking, while the open/ close button no longer disappears beneath the tray itself. Ejecting the disc a few millimetres more would have helped, though.

Audio conversion and conditioning is carried out by good-quality parts, including a 192kHz capable DAC ? ironically the chip used by Cyrus for the SE circuit also includes a DAC which, being of lower quality, is simply ignored. This model is not compatible with the PSX-R power supply either, but a lone digital output provides some upgrade potential.

Capable performer

Another well-balanced and generally very capable performance, with lots going for it in most areas. To the extent that if there was any criticism, it centred on the sound not being quite as large-scale as a couple of the listeners might have wished for, with less of the 'reach-out-and-grab-you' quality that characterised one or two of the other players. Otherwise, comments were pretty much praise all the way.

Of particular note is the way this player can offer detail and precision at the same time as rhythmic vitality. This is quite a rare combination: plenty of audio kit can do one or the other, but finding both together is pretty much the Holy Grail of hi-fi.

It's only fair to admit that the degree of detail seems (both from our 'blind' listeners' notes and from our own sighted listening) a shade behind that of the Arcam, say, and the rhythmic aspect is not quite on a par with the Unison Research, but the crucial point is that unless comparisons like that are on hand, you wouldn't be aware that the 6SE is missing anything.

Musically adept

As a result, the thick scoring of Shostakovich is clearly revealed and laid neatly before the listener, while the energy and sheer pleasure in the music-making of The Mavericks comes across quite unfettered. Indeed, that latter track was, perhaps, best served overall by this player compared to others in the test. By identifying each instrument without losing any gusto, the 6SE arguably got closer than any to the soul of the track.

Frequency extension is excellent at both ends, with powerful, but still controlled bass and elegantly sparkling treble, while the midrange is very neutral and portrays voices with natural resonance and high intelligibility. Stereo imaging is rock-solid and has very good depth which remains stable with changes in level and texture.
(Reviewed by Richard Black - Hi Fi Choice Issue 318)
home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers

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Cyrus CD6 SE

Postby Robert » Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:51 am

from http://www.avreview.co.uk/news/article.asp?UAN=2852&v=1

Overview
Price: £800
Size: 215x78x360mm
Weight: 3.1kg
Formats: CD, CD-R (finalised)
Line out: Stereo phono x2
Digital out: SPDIF optical
DAC: 24 bit current output with integrated digital filter

Big in depth describes both Cyrus 6SE's shape and performance, and it shares the latest thinking inside the box with a breakthrough disc reading system. SE stands for Servo Evolution and that is exactly what it is.

Disc loading is different right from the start as there's no disc tray, and it does something familiar in automotive mechanisms - grabs the edges of the disc. When it gets there and starts spinning, new reading concepts come into play, the like of which has never quite been seen this way before. In a nutshell, it reads the disc more efficiently. Greater efficiency means less crap with the digital information, and cleaner info reduces noise by lowering the amount of error correction required. It's a bit more complicated than that, and for readers who must know more - it's all on the Cyrus website. A chilled attitude when the disc is pushed into the slot is advisable. Hesitation, or at the other end of the scale, aggressive poking, is not liked by the Cyrus deck. After repeated use, I decided loading is a knack which is acquired as you get used to it.

Its unusual shape encourages its use with other Cyrus kit which can be stacked with it. Used with conventional hi-fi boxes, it sits a little uneasily on the equipment stand. It's available, like other Cyrus products, in a dull silvery colour or black.

Build quality is obvious and the display is a soft green with black microdot LCD chaplets offering proper words without awkward mixed upper and lower cases. All the important buttons are there on the front panel, handy if the dog has eaten the remote. The Cyrus 'one-remote-fits-all' policy means that the Cyrus-collecting user gets more than one compatible remote. The controller is vaguely Sky-remote-like which for most users will be perfectly acceptable. Not all the buttons seemed intuitively in the right place but again, something to get used to.

Verdict
Plus points
Has a stability of sound stage all of its own - so good, it feels almost understated at first. Picks out tiny musical cues like a terrier while mastering massive dynamics. Extra points earned in providing a comprehensive upgrading service.
Minus points
Disc-loading takes patience until you get to know its foibles. Not the fastest reader in the west. A small point - the remote control shares no obvious design cues with the player.

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home office: Dell laptop running JRriver MC22 / Meridian Explorer / AKG 550's
music room: PC transport running JRiver MC22 / Naim DAC-V1 / Naim Supernait 2 / Neat Motive SX2
kitchen: Naim Unitiqute 2 / Naim NAP100 / Totem Dreamcatchers